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Protein in Urine

On Health & Drugs & Medications » Diabetes

5,564 words with 5 Comments; publish: Sat, 15 Dec 2007 05:26:00 GMT; (90046.88, « »)

Found out today that I have small amounts of protein in my urine. Doctor said if I maintain good control of my blood glucose (last A1C result was 6.3) and lower my blood pressure, there should be no further damage. My BP today was 138/80 (which isn't bad for a person WITHOUT diabetes) but he wants it lower! Also told me that the American Heart Association is changing their standards for cholesterol levels. An LDL of 100 was considered good but now they want it to be 80 or less. My last cholesterol reading was 184 total, 60 HDL and 100 LDL. So doctor is increasing my cholesterol and BP meds.

Anyone else have urine protein problems and what have you done?

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  • 5 Comments
    • Noodles, I have a more severe case of this - with extreme amounts of protein in my urine - its called Nephrotic Syndrome. In my case, they are not really sure of the cause, according to my doctors I have not been diabetic long enough (which I am not so sure about) and I have very low blood pressure. In April I was spilling 4.5 grams of protein... anything over 2 grams is considered serious, but anything over 150 mg is abnormal. If yours is mild, there are medications they will give you if your doctor feels you need it or if you are experiencing edema. Sometimes diuretics are used, other times ace inhibitors are used.

      Can I ask - who diagnosed this? What type of test was done? I have a recommendation. If your regular GP diagnosed this, you should be seen by a Nephrologist, regardless of the severity. Diabetics are at great risk for kidney disease and proteinuria is often the first stage. A Nephrologist can better work with you to properly diagnose the severity of your condition and prevent progression.

      If you have not yet had a 24 hour urine collection and a full renal panel, you should have this done as a follow-up. Often the protein is found in spot-check of the urine, but this is the most inaccurate method of diagnosing a problem. The fact that they found a problem means you should have the more thorough 24-hour analysis done.

      Also, just as an fyi - this type of kidney disease is why I am always recommending that diabetics limit their intake of protein. You do really need to be careful about this now, and I recommend that you take steps to make sure you do not eat more than 25-30% of your calories as protein - not just for the day, but for each meal as well. This is one measure you can take that will protect your kidneys from further damage.

      #1; Sun, 16 Dec 2007 19:41:00 GMT
    • It was not diagnosed through a 24 hour urine test...think it was just a dip test. My next blood test will be in November and I noticed my doctor checked "full renal panel" on the form. He said I have small amounts of protein in my urine and with good glucose/blood sugar control, the situation should not get any worse. I did some reading on the internet and that's basically the same information I found. I guess I was amazed that I was first diagnosed in February and my glucose readings have been on the low side. My A1C when diagnosed was only 6.6. Doctor told me blood pressure control is equally important and he did increase my ACE inhibitor medication.
      #2; Sun, 16 Dec 2007 19:42:00 GMT
    • Noodles, I would still ask for the 24-hour test. The dip tests are highly inaccurate. Did you ask how much protein? Also, when they find "a little" protein, its advised to have another test within 30 days so they can see if or how it is progressing.

      My Nephrologist described "leaking kidneys" like "bleeding gums" - while the amount is important, any amount indicates a problem. Diabetics need to take certain precautions that non-diabetics do not. Your GP is likely not trained to properly to treat the kidneys - I still recommend that you see a Nephrologist - kidneys are their specialty and only they can really treat kidney disorders and advise you properly on a diet that supports your kidneys. If a Nephro tells you your condition is mild or insignificant, then at least you will know. But the kidneys are too important to take lightly.

      My A1C is low now, too - 5.3. Glucose control may prevent further progression, but may not, and it usually will not reverse a kidney disorder.

      The Ace Inhibitor medications help the kidneys in other ways. I still don't have a clear undertsanding of why this is, but your dr may have increased your AI meds for kidney support, not necessarily for blood pressure reasons. I am on a AI and have to watch my BP carefully, because I am low to begin with... I have to check it several times per day. On the meds, I run about 85/50... they want to increase the AI for my kidneys, but can't because my BP is too low!

      #3; Sun, 16 Dec 2007 19:43:00 GMT
    • I have a large amount of protien in my urine which diabetes specialists have told me is the start of diabetic kidney damage, however a kidney specialist recently told me not to worry about it as its unlikely theres any kidney damage

      it seems kidney specialists and diabetes specialists have different ideas on how to interprate protien in the urine

      #4; Sun, 16 Dec 2007 19:44:00 GMT
    • I have a large amount of protien in my urine which diabetes specialists have told me is the start of diabetic kidney damage, however a kidney specialist recently told me not to worry about it as its unlikely theres any kidney damage

      it seems kidney specialists and diabetes specialists have different ideas on how to interprate protien in the urine How much protein? Did you see a Nephrologist? I find it odd that they would tell you not to worry. You might want a 2nd opinion. Usually its the GPs that take it too casually.

      #5; Sun, 16 Dec 2007 19:45:00 GMT